Having Evidence to Support Your Gut…is Priceless!

Hiring & managing people is hard.And, that’s why you make the BIG bucks!

Many dental executives are unfamiliar with the value of talent assessments. They think of them as dispensable “personality tests” that add unnecessary cost. Yet, dozens of industry leaders would beg to differ. They say, these tools make daily management challenges much easier and helps them get where they want to go. 

Check out today’s Sales Success Snippet for more on how you can become more decisive hiring, make less mistakes and discover how to better tailor your approach to the unique needs of every member of your team. 

If you’d like to learn more about how talent assessments are a sales manager’s secret weapon, join us for a FREE webinar on Friday, October 25 at 10:00 AM EDT. 


How To Write A Job Post That Attracts Top Talent

Most job postings are tired, ineffective and passé.  Instead, write enticing ads that woo, attract and excite. To do this, dust off those old-fashioned job descriptions that describe your company and position in a ‘professional’ and boring manner. Bring a little creative, fun and lighthearted twist, with these ideas:

Turn your postings upside down and inside out. Write from the prospective employee’s POV. Lead with job and company details that appeal to candidates instead of company demands. Get rid of postings that describe job ‘requirements’, ‘essential duties’, ‘skills expected’ and replace them with key attributes about what makes being a team member so special. This demonstrates you understand employment is a mutual value exchange and you’ll provide a great environment for it to happen.

Understanding the Buyer Desire of a Dentist

 

Winning and keeping the attention of dentists to consider a new product is tougher and more expensive than it’s ever been. Marketers and sales professionals have had to get very creative to get their foot in the door and most efforts crash and burn.

We’ve made it our business for the past 25 years to get inside of the mind of the dentist. Our intent was to understand their needs, wants and expectations for products they buy, what they continue to use and the people and companies they choose to do business with. The data allows us to bring fresh timely insights and customer intelligence to our clients—dental manufacturers and distributors who want to do better, serve better and forge stronger relationships with the practitioners they serve.

Until recently, our research results about dentists have been reserved for our private clients. Now, we are going public with the good stuff—and you have as much to gain as our clients who have created impressive results using it. Apparently, it really is true—when you know better—you do better. It is my privilege to share this information with you this platform, The Dental Industry Insider.

Dentists, like other consumers, use very specific criteria for making buying decisions. By aligning your marketing and sales efforts with why consumers buy, you automatically elevate your impact, influence and results. We know why dentists buy. And, in this episode, Understanding the Buyer Desire of a Dentist we share the exact factors they consider importance when buying anything.

The information inside this program will pay on going returns over and over to boost your effectiveness marketing to the Dental community. We’ve included practical action steps both marketing and sales teams can take to ensure your entire sales process is covered on both ends.

One last thing, I ran a little experiment to check out how a few promotional pieces compared to the important motivators we’ve uncovered and the results, to be honest, kind of blew me away! I didn’t expect to find what I found. [I think it will raise your eyebrows, as well!]. Check out the results for FREE by downloading The Dental Advertisement Analysis, it features 21 recent ads in two popular dental journals.

 

Leader: Are You the Real Deal?

 

Given the dynamic changes occurring in the dental industry and business today, managers face the complex challenge to adapt and succeed in an ever-evolving workplace.

Businesses of all sizes are facing a leadership gap. Baby Boomers are off to retirement and Millennials already fill more than 34 percent of the workforce. This dramatic shift in experience brings an important change in culture and employee expectations.

Organizations are struggling to develop their leaders at a fast-enough pace. According to The American Society of Training and Development, businesses spend more than $170 billion dollars on leadership training to build a strong front line for today and stabilize themselves for the tomorrow.

Biggest Takeaways You Don’t Want to Miss:

  • What are the differences between a leader and a manager? 
  • Critical competencies that exemplify a leader
  • How to really know if you have what it takes

FREE Leadership Assessment Offer:

Discover Your Leadership Talents Today

Click on the image below to continue to the Podcast

How to Measure the Sales Potential of Any Lead

Not all leads are created equal.

Many lead qualification programs that have shown that as little as 5 to 15 percent of all inquiries turn out to be truly sales-ready opportunities.

Adopting a qualifying process focuses your selling efforts on the best leads saving you valuable time, energy and expense pursuing new customers.

 

 

Biggest Takeaways You Don’t Want to Miss:

  • Why Qualifying Is Critical to Sales Effectiveness
  • Account Quality vs. Lead Quality
  • When Is a Lead Worth Your Time?
  • Account Qualification Index (AQI)
  • Straight Forward Steps To Qualify Any Lead

 

Today I have 2 great FREE downloads you can’t afford to miss out on!

Get your FREE Account Qualification Index Calculator here!

And you don’t want to miss out on the FREE Common Lead Qualification Factors either!

 

10 Prep Steps to CRUSH IT in an Interview

A Harvard Business Review study concluded that up to 90% of all hiring decisions are based on the interview, yet a similar study by Michigan State University found that interviews reveal only a 14% accurate view of the candidate. That’s why a well-structured interview process is so important.

There are plenty of factors that can derail the success of an interview. Hiring managers let personal bias get in the way of finding the best candidates and candidates think the power of their personality will carry them to a job offer. The truth is, finding the right fit in an interview is hard to do.

We’ve prepared ten practical pointers to assist you in your next interview. It doesn’t matter if you are doing the hiring or a candidate searching for the right role, this podcast delivers valuable advice.

It can be confusing to keep all of the information on potential job opportunities straight, so we’ve got you covered. Your Potential Employer Template will keep you organized and focused on the information that really matters.Click Here to download it now.

Biggest Takeaways You Don’t Want to Miss:

  • Candidates will retain your power and spot the best possible opportunity for a job you’ll love.
  • Hiring managers will learn to spot hidden superstars.
  • Steps to prepare for both an in person and Skype online interview
  • Learn the right questions to determine the right fit for you and your company
  • Simple steps to let go of limiting thoughts that hold you back from being your best

3 Small Steps that make a BIG Difference Selling to Dentists

For the past two decades in my work as a sales coach, I have witnessed hundreds of product presentations and attempts to influence dental consumers. Each year, we gather feedback from clinical professionals about their buying habits and the qualities they look for in the people and companies they buy from. The results indicate, there are several common ways representatives unknowingly hurt themselves when selling to dentists.

Dental professionals make buying decisions differently than typical consumers or fellow healthcare providers. And, when reps understand how their customer want to buy, their influence and value improves and sales increase. For your benefit, I have summarized three of the most common mistakes made selling to dentists and their staff.

PRESCRIPTION BEFORE DIAGNOSIS IS MALPRACTICE

Dental offices are busy with limited time for unexpected interruptions and unplanned meetings from salespeople. Reps know they need to get to the point and purpose of their call quickly. For most reps, that translates to jumping into a memorized product presentation of features and benefits. Salespeople rationalize this ‘short cut’ approach by getting to the ‘meat’ of their message thinking it demonstrates respect for the clinician’s time. Unfortunately, most dentists see it as an informative distraction.  In medical terms, most reps offer a prescription before a relevant diagnosis is ever made.

Salespeople would be much more effective in their results if they first asked a few ‘diagnostic’ or qualifying questions. Effective diagnostic questions strategically uncover key pain points by exposing limitations in the product being used now. They also reveal valuable insights about a prospect’s critical needs, wants and expectations for buying.  More importantly, well crafted questions will lead prospects to consider their reasons why they might switch to a new product. This simple approach seems ridiculously obvious why and how it positively improves sales, yet, so few representatives do it. We have coached hundreds of salespeople to adopt this technique (using our proprietary I.D.E.A. ApproachTM sales model) and their results improved significantly.

OVERLY FOCUSED ON PRICE & PROFIT

Most reps learn early on, “selling is a numbers game”. And, it makes sense when salespeople are hyper focused on numbers because their compensation and career depend on it. Another common mistake reps make, is to assume dentists share the same money motivation (price and profit) for buying. As a result, finance focused sales presentations are missing what matters most to clinical providers, lowering the likeliness of earning an order.
Healthcare consumers are interested at getting good value for their purchases but do not buy based primarily on money matters. The majority of dentists practicing today make buying decisions based on how it will advance their ability to improve patient outcomes. This includes a better cosmetic result, stronger restoration, provide safer treatment delivered faster with more comfort. This means, to attract interest and increase influence and ultimately win approval for an order, healthcare sales professionals must prioritize patient care over price or profit in their presentations.

To do this, seek to understand where the clinical challenges are in using their current product. Ask questions to uncover specific limitations in how a product is used, delivered, performs, lasts or impacts safety. Then use strong product knowledge to describe your product’s exact clinical advantages over what they are using now. Concisely describe how patient care is more comfortable, safer, faster, stronger or cosmetically better than any product they’ve seen.

As a dental hygienist, the best sales secret I can offer is that most healthcare professionals buy for the same reason they entered the industry and that is to help people. Salespeople who focus on and work to improve the quality of patient care their customers provide will be richly rewarded with higher credibility, faster trust and better sales.

POSITION PRODUCT AS A SOLUTION

When discussing their product or service, salespeople typically describe the same set of product features and benefits. As if, the prospect is expected to hear something to grab their interest and then buy. Unfortunately, this approach ends up sounding like a canned sales spiel. And, requires the prospect, not familiar with your product advantages, must figure out how their procedures, processes and patients will benefit. This is not exactly the customer focused service any buyer desires or deserves.

Every customer believes they and their situation is unique. Generically reciting features and benefits as a sales presentation undermines the very results reps are attempting to achieve. So, positioning your product or service to prescriptively address buyer needs, wants or desires will always be more effective than a generic sales spiel.

Offering a solid product recommendation that improves or resolves client challenges is the very essence of consultative selling. And, according to hundreds of healthcare buyers, an approach they are craving to receive. Most dental reps would become much more consultative if more focused on positioning their offer to improve a buyer’s current situation. Even if the doctor doesn’t yet know it can be improved. That’s where effective qualifying questions, good product knowledge and a powerful sales process make a big impact.

We have developed a template of ‘Diagnostic Questions’ for uncovering how any product or service can be beau-tifully positioned as a solution. This sales tool has been field tested and fine-tuned to work well with dental and healthcare consumers. You can have it for FREE by downloading it here. [Diagnostic Questions Template] 

Why Trusting Your Gut Instinct is a Bad Hiring Strategy

There are a variety of factors that can negatively impact hiring decisions. One bad hire is one hire to many. Staying alert to the common factors that derail recruiting will minimize mistakes. One such frequent fail is trusting your gut when assessing candidates. Over 39% percent of company leaders say they rely on personal instincts when hiring. And, not surprisingly, 71 percent of the same line managers surveyed would change their hiring decisions if given a second chance.

Relying on gut instinct when interviewing is a bad idea because it introduces unconscious filters that can bring unwarranted opinions, feelings and considerations that get in the way of making objective hiring decisions. As a result, less qualified candidates may receive unmerited advantage and those potentially a better fit overlooked. In an ideal world, hiring managers would select job candidates based on credentials and their track record for results.

People like people most like themselves. As a result, personal bias may show up where common interests are shared or the same sports team or alma mater are followed. According to UCLA Professor and author of Social: Why Our Brains Are Wired to Connect explains, “Social connection is as important as food and shelter. It’s been baked into our operating system for tens of millions of years.” These associations are not harmful or negative in and of themselves. Only when they bring unfair advantage when objectivity and balanced decision making is required do they add risk to the hiring process.

Our brain makes broad brushed assumptions or stereotypes to gain greater understanding and influence with others. Social scientists once believed that only bigoted people used stereotypes. However, it turns out, all of us routinely stereotype others, without knowing it.

In a typical interview situation stereotyping can undermine impartial decision making and add risk to employee selection practices. For example, when we are exposed to people of different cultures, ethnicities or religious practices. Despite a commitment to embrace diversity, we are hard wired to view differences as reason for separation not harmony.

Consider the notion, all blacks are good athletes. Fat people are lazy. People with glasses are smart. Mexicans came to America illegally. Arabs and Muslims are terrorists. Jews are greedy and all Irish are drunks. These exaggerated untrue and inappropriate beliefs constantly press up against our inner most desire to be fair, impartial and open minded. Ignore them we fall victim to their lies.

Competency stereotyping tends to be more insidious when making hiring decisions. Intellectually, we know that hair color has no influence on intelligence yet, blondes are commonly jeered as ‘airheads’ or dumb. Yet, could hair color effect a person’s candidacy for a position requiring high intellect? Would an Asian candidate receive higher favor for a job demanding strong competency in math and science? Is it possible a female hiring manager would be disinclined to hire an individual native to a country known for undervaluing women? Alert to the presence of all forms of prejudice, we control its influence and limit the impact.

Individuals who carry a commanding presence may set up hiring resistance against themselves. When meeting powerful people, it is likely you will either get inspired or intimidated. One creates a positive impression the other repels it. It is natural to be wary of people who we perceive as a threat to our status within an organization. Hiring managers may unintentionally overlook strong and potentially exceptional employees in an effort to protect his own power and position.

Allowing all forms of personal bias to negatively influence hiring decisions can lead to hiring mistakes and expose managers and their organizations to considerable risk. In addition, superstars who might have made considerable contribution may be bypassed for lesser qualified candidates. All forms of social profiling sets up untrue unfair conditions whereby the best person for the job overlooked. As a result, we must stay rigorous in our efforts to recognize when personal bias raises its head and adhere to solid hiring practices that reveal individuals who represent the best cultural and job fit.

The best weapon to combat the negative influence of personal prejudice is to rely on a structured selection protocol that standardizes the hiring process among candidates, eliminating much subjectivity. These interviews pose the same set of questions in the same order to all candidates, allowing clearer more accurate comparisons between them. This may seem like an obvious approach, but incredibly it remains underused. The dialogue during the interview will be slightly more awkward than it already is, but the payoff in reduction in risk and discovery of the right people for the company and the job is worth the effort.

Keep your bias at bay and spot your next superstar using this FREE Candidate Interview Scorecard for fast easy talent candidate comparison HERE.

How to Spot & Keep Top Talent

Using Science and Technology to Create a Happier More Productive Company

The key to building a high performance organization is to recognize, recruit and retain the elite few who will make the greatest contribution to desired results. Most people are at their best during the hiring process. A comic once said, “The closest some people come to perfection is on a resume!” And, unfortunately, it’s true—some even stretch the truth to score a job. Fifty-six percent of more than 2,000 hiring managers say they’ve caught a lie on a resume, according to a 2015 Career Builder survey. This makes it difficult to recognize superstars from the mediocre performers.

When a leading sports coach was asked how he consistently assembled winning teams he said, “It’s easy! I can smell a champion a mile away!” Fortunately, advancements in technology and human sciences have made your job, as a hiring manager, a lot easier to sniff out champions. Today, with computer-aided tools, it is possible to compare the skills of employees or job candidates against critical job requirements with a high degree of accuracy. When talents match up, success comes easier and employees are more productive and happier at work. This means, increased retention of superstars who require considerably less direction and supervision.

A large number of organizations employ rudimentary and haphazard approaches to selecting their workforce. This represents a serious disconnect for companies that claim their talent management system offers a competitive advantage. Many firms fail to use scientifically proven assessments to make selection decisions; even though such assessments have been shown to significantly increase productivity, reduce costs and attrition and offer other critical organizational outcomes that translate into literally millions of dollars. There are many financial advantages associated with using assessment tools to guide selection and employee development decisions.

The obvious question: which assessments are best and how can their results benefit you? There are hundreds of assessment tools on the market today. Yet, not all are appropriate for spotting the best talent. Sample the power of our assessments and learn what motivates people at work by clicking here.

There are legal, cultural and financial considerations hiring managers must be aware of when utilizing assessments in the workplace.

Legal

United States law holds that employment practices (E.g. use of pre-employment aptitude tests) may be considered discriminatory and illegal if they have a disproportionate “adverse impact” on members of a minority group. Not all assessment instruments on the market meet the EEOC and OFCCP standards; therefore it is wise to verify those selected do not adversely impact any protected groups.

Ethical

There should be good evidence that assessments are both accurate and valid. Accuracy or reliability means the results are reliably repeatable or consistent. Validity, on the other hand, is the proof that the tool actually measures what it says it does. Example, if an assessment claims to assess selling skills, their needs to be strong evidence to prove or back up that claim.

Cultural

Your company culture is your brand. Think about how your current organization differs from competitors or other firms you have been with in the past. It is important, therefore, that company, cultural and job attributes are considered in the assessment process. These requirements serve as desired benchmark talents to compare people for selection, training and promotion.

Financial

Differences in cost of assessments, ranging from free to over $1,500 per person, vary greatly as does the value they provide. As a general rule, these tools are like most purchases; you get what you pay for. It is only when the benefits received outweigh the cost incurred that any expense becomes an investment. To squeeze the biggest return from assessments, clarify the results you expect (i.e. reduce turnover, spot leaders, save time hiring) along with how you intend to use the information gained.

Quality assessments administered by qualified experts offer considerable advantages in recognizing, recruiting, and retaining top performers. They do this by providing accurate insights to reveal job fit, cultural compatibility and predict performance. As a result, employee turnover is reduced, job satisfaction increases and overall productivity is improved. The bottom line: companies using assessments employ more people doing more work they are good at and enjoy.

ANSIR International invites managers of dental companies to sample a FREE talent assessment measuring workplace motivators. Get access to complete your FREE custom Driving Forces Motivators just Click Here by August 31, 2016. (Your results will be automatically sent to you upon completion of the assessment.)

Leadership is not a Popularity Contest

Working toward goals gives our lives meaning and purpose

As a manager, it is more important to be respected than popular. Yet, bosses often relinquish their leadership responsibility to ensure their employees are answerable for their actions because they want to be liked.

There are significant consequences when employee accountability is low. The most important, individual and corporate productivity fails to reach its true potential. These organizations are easy to spot because plans never get off the ground, agreed upon actions are not completed or commitments are not fulfilled.  If people are not carrying their weight, others feel the burden of picking up the slack and begin to resent it. As a result, employee motivation and initiative is severely lacking, morale drops creating a culture that rewards mediocrity.

Human beings are teleologic—they are target seeking individuals. Working toward goals gives our lives meaning and purpose. Therefore, people (especially salespeople) inherently want to learn, grow and contribute to something meaningful. They even desire a healthy environment of discipline where they are held accountable reach their goals and those of their employer. When business professionals are not held to certain performance standards—effort relaxes, productivity declines and expectations are not met.

Managers are often unclear on how to hold people accountable—they tend to be too harsh or too soft. As a result, they tend to shy away from demanding their employees keep their commitments because they are afraid or want to avoid confrontation. They believe, if they press — people will quit or undermine their efforts. The most common reason managers fail to hold their people accountable is they value popularity over being effective.

Somewhere along the line, bosses adopted the misconception that good management means being “friends” with subordinates. They believe that if they can get their teams to like them enough—they will work harder for them. Yet, this could not be farther from the truth. The most effective leaders are trusted first then respected. How much would you trust and respect a supervisor for allowing you to get away with mediocrity when you were actually wired for greatness?!

Frankly, it is much easier to let employees off the hook. It takes a lot of time to monitor, follow up, guide, correct, advise and help people stay on track.